Elite media defines neutrality in terms of a white guy who doesn’t even exist

Wesley Lowery's terrific op-ed made me think about how transformative it could be if reporters and editors started visualizing their audience as widely diverse, rather than as one imaginary white guy whose politics are exactly half-way between Democrats and Republicans.

Right message, wrong messenger: NYT’s Peter Baker decries the ‘normalization’ of Trump’s presidency

In Friday's New York Times, chief White House correspondent Peter Baker tut-tutted the “normalization” of Donald Trump’s profoundly aberrational presidency. But it's not the public that treats Trump like he's a normal president. It's Baker and his colleagues. I have the receipts.

There’s a better way to present opinions online – with radical transparency – and...

Publicly revealing the reason for publishing each essay would allow opinion editors to maintain – even clarify – their moral and journalistic values while at the same time exposing readers to the full range of the sometimes appalling public discourse, rather than protecting them from it.

Tom Cotton op-ed exposes leadership problems at the New York Times

Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger defended the publication of Tom Cotton's controversial op-ed, noting: "We don't publish just any argument -- they need to be accurate, good faith explorations of the issues of the day." And that’s the whole point. By publishing the op-ed, the Times was vouching for its accuracy and its good faith, and was validating its topic as a legitimate issue, worthy of serious debate.

New York Times health reporter Donald McNeil deserves accolades, not a scolding

After sounding off on the dismal federal response to the coronavirus on CNN, McNeil didn't deserve to be scolded by the Times for going “too far in expressing his personal views.” He did exactly what more journalist desperately need to be doing right now. He expressed himself with authority, and passion, and alarm.

Political journalists are still headlining Trump’s nonsense and trying to explain his decision-making. Stop!

Trump repeatedly makes it clear to anyone listening that he has no idea what he's talking about, and no plan to get the country back to normal. But too many political journalists are still working under assumptions that apply to normal presidents and trying to explain his thinking.

Trump coverage gets real, but the New York Times is still, inexplicably, giving him...

Mainstream journalists seem to have finally acknowledged the direct line of causality between Donald Trump’s delusions and incapacities and the federal government’s disastrous failure to respond to a public-health emergency. But the New York Times is still giving Trump the benefit of the doubt in one major way: By continuing to assume -- against all evidence -- that he is actually trying to do the right thing.

Get political reporters off the coronavirus story because they don’t distinguish between right and...

One of the many ways the public is ill-served by the White House chokehold on information about the coronavirus crisis is that it gives way too big a role to the White House press corps, which sees everything through a political lens – and a warped political lens, at that. But this story is too damned important to be covered as a two-sided battle over who’s winning the narrative.

Big media is covering up Trump’s terrifying incoherence in a time of emergency

Just look at some of the things he said. Wednesday’s briefing was arguably the most abnormal moment yet in a profoundly abnormal presidency. But top news organizations, rather than accurately representing Trump’s alarming behavior, made it sound like nothing untoward happened at all.

Bloomberg’s outrageous defense of police harassment of young black men gets picked up by...

Progressive podcaster Benjamin Dixon posted the audio on Monday afternoon, explaining how Bloomberg’s “racist explanation and justification… shows that he operates from a deeply troubling framework,” and calling for its widespread dissemination. It worked.